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Gandhi & Congress: Use your intellect and connect dots

Vikrānt Pandyā 0
Some of my #AdarshLiberal friends are very upset & are alleging that I am running a propaganda against Gandhi & Congress. I request them to counter my posts/facts instead of just making such baseless allegations against me. This is neither a propaganda nor anti-Congress campaign but just presentation of facts.
Let me take this opportunity to add some more ghee to the fire.
 
Following are hard facts which might further offend the Congressis. Let’s see if they can deny these facts:
1. Congress Party was started by British in 1885. (AO Hume was a British Officer).
Bal Gangadhar Tilak and Gopal Krishna Gokhale
Bal Gangadhar Tilak on the left and Gopal Krishna Gokhale on the right

2. As the party absorbed more Indians over the next few years, it witnessed the growth of two camps within the party: Hardcore nationalists led by Bal Gangadhar Tilak on one camp, and British loyalists led by Gopal Krishna Gokhale on another camp. (Unfortunately, our schools label nationalists as extremists and the British loyalists as moderates). Gokhale was such an ardent supporter of the British that he had even considered British rule as a divine blessing for India!!

3. As expected, the British launched a massive attack on nationalists, their newspapers/writings were suppressed and they were sent to jail, while the British loyalists like Gokhale were nurtured.
4. Meanwhile, upon completion of his Satyagraha in South Africa in 1914, Gandhi was requested by Gokhale (yeah, the British admirer Gokhale) to “rescue” India from British rule.
5. Here comes the most interesting fact: Gandhi left South Africa in July 1914, but headed straight to England and stayed there till Dec 1914, after which he reached India in early 1915. If Gandhi was supposed to fight against an enemy (British), then why did he have to go to the enemy country (England) for almost 6 months before starting the “fight” against them? Was it to get “briefing” from the British?
6. For the next few years, Gandhi was touring India at his own pace to gain some familiarity of rural India (and also to portray himself as the emerging leader for the masses), but soon after Jallianwala Bagh tragedy in 1919 which shook the British to the core and threatened their existence in India, Gandhi was asked to cut short his India tour and prepare himself to lead & tame the freedom movement. In 1921, he was made the leader of Congress and the freedom movement went into “non-violent” mode and hence could be controlled by the British.
7. For the next 3 decades, Gandhi spoke about non-violence, but recruited (insisted) lakhs of Indians as soldiers to fight in World Wars on behalf of Britain. When it came to Indian freedom movement, Gandhi requested Indians to drop their arms and protest against British only through non-violent methods. But when it came to fighting World Wars on behalf of Britain, he wanted people to take up arms and fight against the enemies of Britain in wars. He even went on to say: “We are regarded as cowardly people. If we want to become free from that reproach we should learn the use of arms.”, thereby urging Indians to take up arms and hence recruit them as soldiers for world wars.
8. For the next 3 decades, Gandhi suppressed all forms of dissent and got rid of anybody who could derail his agenda. He got rid of Bhagat Singh in 1931, Subhas Chandra Bose in 1939 and his veto against Sardar Patel in 1946 so that Nehru could become the PM.
All the above facts are from highly reliable sources and have been scrutinized & verified from multiple sources. All that I have done here is to just present them into a chronological form as dots.

Now, you can join the dots and draw your own conclusions.

copied from a 2015 FB post of Guru Prasad (Link here)
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Gandhi & Congress: Use your intellect and connect dots

written by: Vikrānt Pandyā Time to Read: 6 min
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